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Security Tips

Real Estate Industry a Prime Target for Cybercrime

For more than a decade, the real estate industry has been a rich target for cybercriminals - and recent research reveals the trend has continued to increase.

Real estate transactions have become a prime target because they are highly lucrative. A down payment on a new home can be thousands, even millions of dollars. That amount of money gets passed from buyer to agent, and agent to seller, leaving many opportunities for fraudsters to intercept that money.

The Data You Reveal Online: What Websites Collect

It’s no secret that websites want to know as much as possible about their visitors and their online behavior. This is largely done to improve user experience and increase conversions, but the information can also be used to display targeted ads based on your previous searches.

The Data You Reveal Online: Your Browser

We’ve all been there. You’re searching for a pair of shoes, a kitchen gadget, or an all-inclusive resort online and then you see an ad for it immediately on Facebook.

When browsing the internet, you leave behind digital traces that websites can legally use to keep track of your activities and identify you. Online targeted advertisements use data from your browser to make marketing more personalized. The data collected can include; your location, the type of device you’re using, which links you’ve clicked on, and much more.

The 10 U.S. airports where you're most likely to be hacked

When you think of airport security, baggage screening, TSA checkpoints, and surveillance cameras likely come to mind. But what about cyber-security?

With time to spare at the airport, most fliers are quick to take advantage of free public WiFi networks, without thinking twice. However, according to a new report by cloud security company Coronet, consumers would be wise to consider the risks these public networks pose before cracking open their laptop.

It's Time to Stop Believing These 4 Cybersecurity Myths

Cybersecurity. In recent years, this term has officially became a household name. Rarely does a day pass without news of a cybersecurity breach wreaking havoc on an organization and its customers or patients. 

Luckily, these highly public breaches have led more small-mid size businesses to consider the threat that cybercrime may pose to their enterprise. In our experience, many of these organizations have a few misconceptions when it comes to developing a strong security posture. In order to defend themselves against the risks they face, organizations need to debunk these myths. Here are four of the most common myths:

89% of Top Travel Websites Utilize Unsafe Security Practices

According to Dashlane’s 2018 Travel Website Password Power Rankings, 89% of travel-related websites leave their users’ accounts exceptionally vulnerable to hackers due to unsafe password practices.

The rankings rate password and account security on 55 of the world’s most popular travel-related sites. Dashlane researchers test each website on five critical password and account security criteria. A site received a point for each criterion it met, for a maximum score of 5/5. Any score below 4/5 was considered failing and not meeting the minimum threshold for good password security.

FBI warns that all routers should be rebooted to avoid Russian malware

The FBI has issued a security warning that all home and small office routers should be rebooted after discovering sophisticated Russian-linked “VPNFilter” malware infecting at least 500,000 networking devices.

The malware is capable of blocking web traffic, collecting information that passes through home and office routers, and disabling the devices entirely, the bureau announced.

According to the Justice Department, the Sofacy Group, also known as APT28, or FancyBear, is responsible for the attack. The group, believed to be directed by Russia’s military intelligence agency, is the group that hacked the Democratic National Committee ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

Forget Credit Cards, Hackers Want Your Medical Record

When considering our online privacy and security, we often hold our financial records, bank accounts, and credit card numbers in the highest regard. After all, if a hacker gets this information, they have ‘the keys to the kingdom', right? It might be surprising to learn that the black market value of this data is actually surprisingly low. 

The going rate for your social security number is about a dollar. Your credit card number is worth five dollars. A complete medical record, on the other hand, can sell for more than $1,000 on the Dark Web.

TeenSafe app leaked tens of thousands of user passwords

Two servers used by an app for parents to monitor their teenagers' phone activity have exposed the account information of tens of thousands of parents and children.

The mobile app, TeenSafe, allows parents to track the smartphone usage of their children, including their social media interactions, web history, call logs, installed apps, and real-time location. According to the Los Angeles-based company behind the service, more than a million parents currently use the service.

Was your child's identity stolen in 2017?

Data breaches put millions at risk each year. And while many victims are adults, it seems that no one is too young to become a victim of identity fraud. 

According to a new study by Javelin Strategy & Research, over 1 million US children had their identities stolen in 2017 - resulting in $2.6 billion in fraud, with families paying over $540 million out of pocket.

Even worse, these attacks can occur before children even become active internet users. 66 percent of child identity fraud victims are younger than eight years old.