Viewing entries tagged
hack

How Long Does It Take to Breach a Healthcare Network?

A recent survey of hackers, incident responders, and penetration testers revealed that the majority can gain access to a targeted system within 15 hours, but more than half of hackers (54%) take less than five hours to gain access to a system, and steal sensitive data. 

The data comes from the 2018 Nuix Black Report and its survey of 112 hackers and penetration testers, 79% of which were based in the United States.

It's Time to Stop Believing These 4 Cybersecurity Myths

Cybersecurity. In recent years, this term has officially became a household name. Rarely does a day pass without news of a cybersecurity breach wreaking havoc on an organization and its customers or patients. 

Luckily, these highly public breaches have led more small-mid size businesses to consider the threat that cybercrime may pose to their enterprise. In our experience, many of these organizations have a few misconceptions when it comes to developing a strong security posture. In order to defend themselves against the risks they face, organizations need to debunk these myths. Here are four of the most common myths:

What is Cryptojacking and How Can You Defend Against it?

Cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin and Monero, have rapidly grown in popularity due to their security and value. But investors and consumers aren’t the only ones interested in them. Hackers are using malicious tactics to steal cryptocurrency - and they’re doing it with your computer.

Equifax Finds 2.4 Million More Victims of 2017 Breach

Last month, reports surfaced that more information than previously thought may have been exposed in Equifax's massive data breach, and now, the company has confirmed it. Equifax said Thursday that 2.4 million more people than it previously believed were affected by its massive data breach last year, the second time it has revised up estimates of the number of Americans whose information was stolen.

In October of last year, Equifax revealed that forensics investigators had concluded that 2.5 million more US consumers were affected by the data breach it revealed in September, bringing the total number at that time to 145.5 million. This new revelation raises the number of victims in the US to 147.9 million people.

Ransomware attack on Sacramento Bee database exposes 19.5M California voter records

The Sacramento Bee deleted two databases hosted by a third party after a ransomware attack exposed the voter records of 19.5 million California voters and contact information for 53,000 current and former subscribers to the newspaper.

The paper refused to pay the hackers' demand for a bitcoin ransom and is notifying subscribers whose information was affected, according to its publisher Gary Wortel, who also serves as west regional publisher at parent company McClatchy.

The Sacramento Bee said in a statement that a firewall protecting its database was not restored during routine maintenance last month, leaving the 19,501,258 voter files publicly accessible for two weeks. Additionally, the names, home addresses, email addresses, and phone numbers of 52,873 Sacramento Bee subscribers, who activated their digital accounts prior to 2017, were compromised.

Indiana Health System Pays $47,000 Ransom to Unlock Patient Data

Indiana hospital system, Hancock Health, said it paid hackers 4 bitcoin, or about $47,000, to unlock it’s network after a ransomware attack on January 11, 2018.

Hackers compromised a third-party vendor’s administrative account to the hospital’s remote-access portal and launched SamSam ransomware, a ransomware variant which encrypts data files on the systems and uses a private key to unlock them. It quickly infected the hospital’s IT system by locking out data and changing the names of more than 1,400 files to "I'm sorry."

Up to 40,000 OnePlus customers affected by credit card security breach

OnePlus, the smartphone manufacturer behind a popular line of Android phones, has reported a credit card breach affecting up to 40,000 users at oneplus.net. Customers who entered their credit card data on the website between mid-November 2017 and January 11, 2018 could be at risk.

The announcement of the data breach followed numerous reports from customers over the weekend of January 13, 2018 related to fraudulent charges appearing on their accounts. The company immediately launched an investigation and learned one of its systems was attacked. A malicious script was injected into the payment page code to steal credit card information as it was being entered.

Still confused after the Equifax breach? Answers to 5 common questions.

Equifax, one of the three main credit reporting companies, said last week that a major data breach exposed Social Security numbers and other important information of millions of people.

The breach affected about 143 million consumers in the United States, as well as some in Canada and the United Kingdom, but Equifax didn't provide a number. Hackers had access to the data between May and July. The company publicly announced the hack on September 7, 2017

Equifax has not done much to clear up public confusion surrounding the breach, affecting nearly half of Americans. Many are left with questions regarding how this happened, and what to do now. 

Here are the answers to 5 common questions: