Viewing entries in
Security Tips

What is Cryptojacking and How Can You Defend Against it?

Cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin and Monero, have rapidly grown in popularity due to their security and value. But investors and consumers aren’t the only ones interested in them. Hackers are using malicious tactics to steal cryptocurrency - and they’re doing it with your computer.

Tech Support Scam Losses Rose 86% in 2017

Tech support scams last year resulted in $15 million in losses, an increase of 86% over 2016, according to the FBI Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3).

In 2017, IC3 received approximately 11,000 complaints related to tech support fraud. The claimed losses amounted to nearly $15 million. While a majority of tech support fraud involves victims in the United States, IC3 has received complaints from victims in 85 different countries.

Social Engineering: How Cybercriminals Exploit Human Behavior (1/3)

Social Engineering. 

It sounds like something that might have a department devoted to it at Facebook Headquarters. But the truth is that social engineering is a type of security breach that takes advantage of human behavior to pull off a cyberattack.

California Predicted to Lose $329M to Cybercrime in 2018

Cybercrime is expected to cost Californians big-time in 2018. Using publicly available data from the FBI and the Insurance Information Institute, researchers at Website Builder Expert have predicted individuals in the Golden State will lose $329 million over the course of this year.

Second place, New York, is expected to lose $139.4 million. Third place, Florida, is expected to lose $111.7 million to cybercriminals this year. These figures put California far ahead of all other states for cybercrime losses.

Meltdown and Spectre: What You Need to Know

By now you’ve probably heard the terms ‘Meltdown’ and ‘Spectre’ making their rounds in security, tech, and even mainstream news. But if you’re like the majority of the population, these terms don’t mean much to you, nor are you actively paying attention the unfolding of events. 

Let’s start by saying that if you’re reading this article, you’re affected. In fact, if you own a computer, smartphone or tablet made in the last 20 years, you are affected. The ‘Spectre ‘and ‘Meltdown’ vulnerabilities affect almost every computer in the world.

Got your attention now?

Meltdown and Spectre are the names of two serious security flaws that have been found within computer processors. They could allow hackers to steal sensitive data without users knowing, one of them affecting chips made as far back as 1995. The vulnerabilities were discovered last year, but only recently disclosed to the public.

How to Have 'the Talk' with Your Parents

It’s time to have ‘the talk’ with your parents - the security talk, that is.

2017 was, undoubtedly, the worst year for cyberattacks of all time; and it’s safe to assume that cybersecurity will get brought up at family get-togethers throughout 2018. With half of the American population affected by Equifax's breach, security will be fresh on everyone’s minds.

Being the tech wiz that you are, your ‘family time’ likely doubles as a free visit from their favorite tech support - and this year will be no different. Uncle Joe will probably bring up the Uber breach coverup (and use it to comment about ‘kids these days’), and Grandma will likely ask you about her Yahoo account (that she’s still using).

Take this opportune moment to provide security tips to all of your family members. Explaining cybersecurity to relatives who grew up in an age without computers can be difficult, so be sure to explain it in a way they’ll understand.

28,434 compromised records and the importance of addressing the insider threat.

The Center For Health Care Services, based in San Antonio, Texas, has notified 28,434 patients of a breach of privacy on their personal and health information. The data was allegedly stolen when a former employee took the information after being fired in 2016.

The compromised data includes patients' Social Security numbers, dates of birth, medical records numbers, dates of services, referral information, progress notes, types of services, diagnoses, medications, lab and toxicology reports, autopsy reports, death certificates, treatment plans and discharge and death summaries.

According to the released statement:  "A former employee of CHCS was discovered to have secretly taken personal health information from CHCS on his personal laptop computer at the time his employment was terminated on May 31, 2016. The discovery was made on Nov. 7, 2017, as a result of documents produced in litigation between the former employee and CHCS."

Protecting your data while shopping online this holiday season.

It is that time of year once again -  the holiday season. With it comes family gatherings, celebrating traditions, and of course, holiday shopping. You’re likely to put together a game plan when it comes to budgeting, where and when to find the best deals, and what to get everyone on your list. But, if you are one of the estimated 59% of Americans that plans to do your shopping online, it’s important to put together a plan for protecting your data, and your money, this holiday shopping season.

Creating a Culture of Security: Review

Creating a culture of security, as you’ve likely gathered, is not a static process. The key to staying ahead of cybercriminals is consistent review and updates. A common mistake organizations make with their security awareness program is failing to plan long term. Often times, they get caught up in the initial roll-out of their training, but forget to plan on updating their program periodically. New types of attacks are consistently generated, so it is important that senior management and the IT department work together to stay ahead of the hackers. The key to maintaining a strong security posture is consistent review and updates. 

Creating a Culture of Security: Recognition & Testing

The process of creating a security culture does not end after awareness training is complete. In fact, each of the preceding steps in this series have built upon one another to get your organization to this point. Now is when the ongoing task of keeping cybersecurity front-of-mind begins.

If you’ve followed our first three steps for creating a culture of security, you’ve set you, your employees, and your organization up for success in these final two steps. The assessment has revealed key strengths and weaknesses in your current cybersecurity environment. Creating buy-in has developed the framework for a company that values security. Your awareness training has provided all key stakeholders with the necessary tools for spotting and mitigating potential cyberthreats.